Ask Jeremy

Hello. Jeremy here. I am dedicating this page to anyone who happens to have any questions about anything baseball. Here you will be able to ask anything you like and I will get back to you A.S.A.P. with a detailed answer.

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You can also start a discussion on any topic you like and I will be sure to join in. Just leave a comment below, or find another comment that interests you and click on reply. I look forward to hearing from you. ~Jeremy

18 thoughts on “Ask Jeremy

    1. Hey David. The earliest trading cards I can think of were produced by Peck and Snyder in 1886. Peck and Snyder was a sporting goods store in New York. I hope that helps. Thanks for stopping by. ~Jeremy

  1. I know this happened a long time ago, but just really curious to know other people’s point of view here. My question is if Michael Jordan did not return to play in the NBA and continued in baseball, will he be successful?

    1. Hi Burnz. Of course this is just my opinion but, if you ask me: absolutely. Jordan just had too much talent to not be successful, in any sport. ~Jeremy

  2. Hi Jeremy, since I am not very familiar with baseball, I have many questions to ask. The first one is the origin of the game itself. How was it started?

    1. Hey Hilda. Although this is debatable, most agree that Alexander Cartwright was the first person to establish a set of rules that all teams could play by in 1845. The first recorded contest was in 1846 between Cartwrights Knickerbockers and the New York Baseball Club in Hoboken,New Jersey. I’ll do some digging for you and elaborate further. ~Jeremy

  3. Hey, Jeremy.

    Awesome blog on baseball 🙂 I live in the UK and have always had an interest in baseball but still not 100% sure how it works, haha!

    Does a game just keep on going until both teams are out? Similar to cricket here in the UK?

    Neil

    1. Hey Neil. I’m not familiar with cricket rules, although I plan to take a closer look as it seems really interesting. A regulation game consists of 9 innings, with each team getting a chance to bat while the other plays defense. The batting teams 1/2 of the inning is over when they get 3 outs. There are no ties. If the score is tied after 9 innings, you would then start to play extra innings. The home team always bats last, giving them the opportunity to tie or win. The game will continue until the home team has the lead in the bottom half of the inning, or the away team has the lead and the home team fails to tie or take the lead.
      You can check out my post on baseball rules here:http://baseballxgear.com/simple-baseball-rules for a more thorough description. Hope that helps Niel and stop back by if I can give you a hand with anything. ~Jeremy

    1. Hi Vince. There are a lot of differences between softball and baseball. For starters the size of the ball.A softball is roughly 12″ in circumference, while a baseball is about 9″. The distance from the pitchers mound in softball is 40′, baseball is 60’6″. Bases in softball are 40′ apart, and baseball bases are 90′ apart. Softball games are usually 7 innings, while baseball is 9 innings. These are just a few differences. While the concept of the games are pretty similar, the differences are quite extensive. If you would like me to elaborate further, drop a reply and I would be more than happy to help. Thanks for stopping by. ~Jeremy

    1. Hey Donna! I’m glad you asked this question as it’s been a sore spot for me for quite some time.
      Now don’t get me wrong, what Pete did was wrong, no question about it. But, at the time there was no proof of which way the bets were (for or against his own team).
      I’m not saying that it would make it right, just that MLB made its ban on the sole assumption that Pete directly affected the outcome of the games he bet on.
      Pete has since apologized for his actions and yet baseball still refuses to even consider this! Why?! When you have admitted steroid users who get ridiculously short suspensions for basically “cheating” the game of baseball for most or part of their career! Was what Pete may or may not have done any different? Worse?
      I think not! Pete was banned after his playing career was over. Can baseball at the very least not recognize his achievements as a player and allow him into the Hall of Fame? Sorry to be so long winded, but I think baseball is practicing hypocrisy at the highest level! I say “let Pete in”. Concern yourself with bigger issues. Ban players for life for steroid use! Stop with the 50 game suspension B.S. Let Pete In!

      Again, sorry for being so long winded. I think Pete’s lifetime ban is ridiculous.
      Thanks for stopping by Donna. What do you think? ~Jeremy

  4. Jer,what are all those stat abbreviations definitions and there meanings??? Use to be home runs runs,rbi’s ect. ect. could you educate me and other’s on this topic.Thanks.P.S. got something on child safety equipment(recomendations)

    1. Hey Randy.
      While there are tons of stat abbreviations, I have compiled a list of some of the most common abbreviations and their meanings.
      If you don’t find a particular stat you are looking for in this link, let me know and I will get you an answer A.S.A.P.
      http://baseballxgear.com/baseball-stats-abbreviations-what-do-they-mean
      I will get back with you as soon as I can with some ideas on child safety equipment.
      Thanks for stopping by and see you next time ~Jeremy

  5. With the Pocket radar gun is there anyway to hook to a computer so it will add data to spread sheet so you can view it later or do you have to have someone standing there and jotting it down?

    1. Hi Tristin.
      The Pocket radar does not have a port to export data to a computer.
      What it does offer that is quite unique, is the ability to record your last 25 speed readings.
      With this feature I am able to adjust grips and mechanics to determine what is and what is not working.
      For example, I will have a pitcher throw 10 pitches with one grip and then make some minor adjustments and have them throw 10 – 15 more. Then I simply hit the recall button to see which grip worked best for that pitcher.
      I suppose if you wanted to enter the info onto a spread sheet on your computer you could do it manually.
      If you are trying to track improvements over a long period of time, that sounds like a good idea.
      I hope that helps and if there is anything else I can help you with, just reply to this comment and I will get back with you a.s.a.p.
      I do believe you will love the Ball Coach. We have been using for a while now and as a training tool for speed, nothing comes close on a money vs feature basis.
      You can read my full review here – http://baseballxgear.com/pocket-radar-ball-coach-review
      Thanks for stopping by ~Jeremy

  6. Awesome site! Thanks for putting the time into it. Why is it that a ball thrown by a pitcher thwt hits the dirt it gets discarded. The next pitch could be a triple hit in the corner, dug out and thrown around the bases a few times after it’s rolled around in the dirt a few more times. It’s then given back to the pitcher and he’ll pitch that ball again? Makes no sense to me

    1. Thank you Chris!
      This site has become a great passion for me. I am happy you enjoy it and I look forward to working on it as much as possible.
      I will give it my best effort. 🙂

      Any “pitched” ball that hits the dirt will be replaced by the umpire. He can put it in his bag and check it when he gets the time to see if it’s “playable”, but the ball will most likely be taken out of the game. They replace the ball immediately so as not to interrupt the flow of the game.

      On a ball that is “hit” and then returned to the pitcher, the pitcher is usually allowed to determine whether or not they want a new ball. If the ball is hit and directly lands in the dirt, the umpire will usually inspect the ball before allowing the pitcher to use it.

      I agree that it makes no sense to immediately replace one and not the other.
      I say replace the ball regardless. That way there is never any doubt.

      Fun fact: Did you know that on average a 9 inning MLB baseball game uses around 100 baseballs!

      Thanks for stopping by Chris and I look forward to talking with you again soon.
      ~Jeremy

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